Introduction to The Seven Deadly Sins of Leadership (Series)

Introduction to The Seven Deadly Sins of Leadership (Series)

“Leadership: the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.” – President Dwight D. Eisenhower   This week, I am pleased to announce a new 9-part series entitled: “The Seven Deadly Sins of Leadership.” Thousands of readers perused our most recent blog series “The 8 Steps to Sure Success.” http://blog.andrewcordle.com/increasing-property-value/introduction-to-the-8-steps-to-sure-success It was so successful and popular to our readers that it motivated me to begin composing another multi-part series. This week’s article is a brief introduction to the impending series about the Seven Deadly Sins of modern business leaders.   I am confident in my opinion that most of us have, at one time or another, worked for a “bad” leader. I can recall several situations in which I literally despised my boss or “leader” at work! I employ a veteran of the US military and he once told me about a quote one of his drill instructors barked at the recruits during recruit training. The drill instructor told his platoon, “A good leader never requires his troops (employees) to engage in work that he is not willing to do himself.” How many times has your boss (or leader) given you a directive that you know deep down that he/she would never do themselves? I can think of countless times this has happened through the years! Nothing loses respect of subordinates like a boss/leader that barks orders that they’d never do themselves if the roles were reversed!   Being a leader is probably the most difficult challenge any of us will ever face during the course of our professional careers. It matters not how long we work at it, but practicing the proper behaviors is a never-ending task. Knowing and evading misguided behaviors is also never-ending. Therefore, the blog series that I will be offering over the next several months will discuss the Seven Deadly Sins of Leadership and how best to avoid them!   Peter Drucker was once quoted as saying that “management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Great leaders possess sensational social intelligence, the drive for change, and above all, a vision that grants them the ability to set their sights on the issues that truly merit attention. It would be irresponsible if we didn’t at least try to include these skill sets in our leadership quiver!   So be sure to check in next week as we discuss the first Deadly Sin of Leadership – RELEVANCE.          ...

Read More »

Never Give Up and Here’s Why

Never Give Up and Here’s Why

On Sunday, January 18, 2014, we witnessed one of the most powerful forces in the universe: Belief! The Seattle Seahawks proved to the world how important it is to believe in your self, to be confident in your abilities, and to be convinced of a result nothing short of a win. They NEVER gave up despite the fact that the entire deck was stacked against them. It got so bad that with 3 minutes and 7 seconds left in the game, the Seahawks probability of a win was a paltry .10%! Yes, that’s 1/10 of 1%! But they persevered until the glorious end. Their fearless young leader, Russell Wilson, had ice running through his veins that night. He had thrown 4 interceptions already that day to an under-rated, un-drafted free agent receiver named Jermaine Kearse. But that did not shake his belief, his conviction, or his determination. He told the offensive coordinator that they’re gonna win that game and he’s gonna do it by throwing a touchdown to Kearse. As the game drifted into over-time, Wilson marched the offense straight down the field and in the final seconds, pitched a 35 yard perfectly thrown touchdown pass to win the NFC Championship for the second season in a row.   While I’ve never played in the NFL, I can relate to the trials of defeat, or likely defeat, and then triumph against the odds. In a matter of months, the Great Recession took me from a million-dollar lifestyle to sleeping in my parent’s basement. Instead of throwing in the towel, like the Seahawks, I took the lessons that I learned at the end of the last real estate bubble and completely restructured both my personal life and my business investing strategies. But this was not just a story of success and failure; it is a story of triumph against the odds with a personal touch. I never gave up. I believed in myself and my abilities. I trusted my Team members and co-workers. I lived by conviction and I refused to stay knocked down…and I won!   “A business that makes nothing but money is a poor business.-Henry Ford Click To Tweet   Last year, I was another victim of the charlatan publisher, Andrew J. Waite. I’ll defer from mincing words here. The guy outright extorted me to advertise in his magazine! I spent literally ten’s of thousands of dollars attempting to keep this man at bay. He would constantly send me veiled threats that he could and would destroy my company and reputation in the real estate industry. However, his feeble attempts to destroy me have failed. I never gave up fighting for my company, for my reputation, and for my family. I stayed determined. I stayed convicted. I believed that the truth would prevail and it has!   My point in sharing these examples is to encourage and motivate...

Read More »

8 Real Estate Investor Habits You Need to Have

8 Real Estate Investor Habits You Need to Have

As a real estate investor your success depends on your habits. Positive habits breed positive results. From the beginning of your real estate investor career to the day you retire, following a set of best practices will keep your business successful.   In this post I want to cover eight real estate investor habits and best practices that you need to have!   Form a Plan A solid business plan is the first thing needed to get your real estate investor career off the ground. In order to know where you’re going, you need to have a map. Take the time to write out what you want to accomplish and the steps you need to take to get there.   Always having a well thought out business plan will keep you on track and keep your real estate investor career successful.   Know Your Market There is nothing more important to a real estate investor than knowing your market. You always need to understand who you are buying and selling to.   You also need to understand the economy in which you are working on. Whether you operate in one city or multiple locations, always stay on top of what the local economy is doing. You may be getting results in a city with one business plan that will not work in a different city.   Master Your Target Market As part of your business plan, figure out what market you want to attack. Whether it is probates, motivated sellers or foreclosures, figure out what market you want to target and do what it takes to master it.   Every real estate investor wants to be the master of their craft. Take the time to master one particular skill or approach before attempting a different strategy. If you try to learn every real estate strategy at once, you’ll end up doing a lot of things halfway and putting way more stress on yourself than you need.   Promote a Referral Program A referral program is a great way to have deals come to you. You, as a real estate investor, should always be looking for new ways to generate leads. Your time is valuable. Offering a referral program is a great way to take a load off of your back and get motivated sellers to call you.   Offer a reward to contacts that you meet either verbally or on a referral card. Tell them to keep your eyes peeled for houses that fit your investment criteria. Having eyes all throughout the city or cities that you work can provide you with extra time to take advantage of other marketing strategies and opportunities.   Stay Educated You have to stay ahead of the game. Always stick to your business plan and to the strategies that get you results. That being said, make time to learn and test out different...

Read More »

There Are Things You Can Control

There Are Things You Can Control

Thirty-five year old George Cowan, a Civil War veteran who had moved to Helena, Montana, to prospect for gold and to work as a lawyer, was thinking of some way to console his wife Emma, who had just lost their first child. Emma was 24 years old. Five years earlier, Yellowstone National Park had been officially dedicated and opened to the public for tourism. Wondering if it would be safe to take his young wife there for some camping and fishing, George spoke to an army scout from the area who said, “You will be as safe in the park as in New York City.”   On August 5, 1877, George and Emma, accompanied by Emma’s brother Frank, her sister Ida and 6 other men, left their home for Yellowstone. Nine days later, the group was in their camp in Yellowstone preparing to go fishing only to find themselves surrounded by Indians from the Nez Perce tribe. The Nez Perce had been living in the Wallowa Valley area of Washington State but had felt forced to leave by encroaching cattlemen. They felt a new home with the Crow Indians of Eastern Montana would be more accommodating or they could migrate to Canada to join the Sioux Indians there. The federal government ordered them to stay in Wallowa temporarily until a better arrangement could be negotiated, but the Nez Perce decided to strike out east on their own. Attempting to prevent their movement, a drunken band of soldiers fell upon a smaller group of the Nez Perce and killed nearly 100 of them, mostly woman and children. Now the Nez Perce felt the bitterness and heavy hand of the federal government and decided to covertly move to Canada and escape. They were passing through Yellowstone on their journey when they met the tourists of George Cowan’s party. On their two-year anniversary, George and Emma found themselves in the middle of the last great frontier Indian battle of the USA.   Emma heard Indians outside of their tent. George, fearing that some bandits may be attempting to steal their provisions, grabbed his shotgun and headed out to meet the intruders. The Indians were indeed trying to talk some of Cowan’s party out of provisions, but George insisted no one would take them without a fight. George’s legal training along with his stubbornness caused him to argue with the Indians who were well-armed and in superior numbers. Years later, George confessed to his daughter Ethel that perhaps his well-known bluntness might have escalated the situation. His great-granddaughter said, “I think my great-grandfather realized he could’ve handled it a little more diplomatically. It’s one of those incidents where hot-headedness prevailed both with the young Indians and my great-grandfather.”   The Indians began to escort the Cowan party to their chiefs at the main camp. The chiefs wished to free them but only if...

Read More »